Quick Answer: Is it possible to be pregnant and still see your period?

Intro. The short answer is no. Despite all of the claims out there, it isn’t possible to have a period while you’re pregnant. Rather, you might experience “spotting” during early pregnancy, which is usually light pink or dark brown in color.

Can you get a full period and still be pregnant?

After a girl is pregnant, she no longer gets her period. But girls who are pregnant can have other bleeding that might look like a period. For example, there can be a small amount of bleeding when a fertilized egg implants in the uterus.

What are the signs of pregnancy even with period?

You can tell if you’re pregnant even if you have irregular periods with signs of pregnancy other than a missed period, such as implantation bleeding, nausea, swollen or tender breasts, fatigue, frequent urination, mood swings, headaches, backaches, and changes in cravings or aversions.

Can you bleed like a period in early pregnancy?

The cause of bleeding early in pregnancy is often unknown. But many factors early on in pregnancy may lead to light bleeding (called spotting) or heavier bleeding.

How soon does your period stop if pregnant?

Not really. Once your body starts producing the pregnancy hormone human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), your periods will stop. However, you may be pregnant and have light bleeding at about the time that your period would have been due. This type of bleeding in early pregnancy is surprisingly common.

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How much can you bleed and still be pregnant?

You may experience some spotting when you expect to get your period. This is called implantation bleeding and it happens around 6 to 12 days after conception as the fertilized egg implants itself in your womb. This bleeding should be light — perhaps lasting for a couple of days, but it’s perfectly normal.

Can I be pregnant and still have a heavy period with clots?

Bleeding in pregnancy may be light or heavy, dark or bright red. You may pass clots or “stringy bits”. You may have more of a discharge than bleeding. Or you may have spotting, which you notice on your underwear or when you wipe yourself.