Is it safe to do dental work during pregnancy?

Dental treatment can be done at any time during pregnancy. However, the best time to perform elective dental treatment during pregnancy is in the second trimester, weeks 14 through 20. Keep in mind that if you have a dental infection or swelling, you might need immediate treatment.

What happens if you get dental work while pregnant?

If you’re pregnant and need a filling, root canal or tooth pulled, one thing you don’t have to worry about is the safety of the numbing medications your dentist may use during the procedure. They are, in fact, safe for both you and your baby.

Is dental anesthesia safe during pregnancy?

Preventive, diagnostic and restorative dental treatment is safe throughout pregnancy. Local anesthetics with epinephrine (e.g., bupivacaine, lidocaine, mepivacaine) may be used during pregnancy.

Can dental work cause miscarriage?

In our opinion, there is no increased risk for miscarriage with dental care and we don’t recommend delaying needed treatment. If major dental work or elective orthodontics is planned, patients might wish to consider waiting until after delivery. This is our general recommendation with most medical procedures.

Which trimester is safe for dental treatment?

However, the best time to perform elective dental treatment during pregnancy is in the second trimester, weeks 14 through 20.

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Do I have to tell my dentist Im pregnant?

Tell your dentist (and doctor) if you are pregnant. Routine dental care can be done any time during pregnancy. Any urgent procedure can be done, as well. All elective dental procedures, however, should be postponed until after the delivery.

Do your teeth get worse after pregnancy?

There is an old saying that you should expect to lose a tooth for every baby born which is more a myth than the truth. Women generally complain that the baby has taken calcium from their teeth and has caused holes in the teeth. This is not true.

How do dentists manage pregnancy patients?

The recommendations are:

  1. Educate the patient about maternal oral changes during pregnancy.
  2. Emphasize strict oral hygiene instructions and thereby plaque control.
  3. Limit dental treatment to periodontal prophylaxis and emergency treatments only.
  4. Avoid routine radiographs. Use selectively and when needed.